clootie dumpling and custard

Easy clootie dumpling recipe made in a pressure cooker

Just behind tablet, the recipe for clootie dumpling is one of those recipes that just scream SCOTLAND! (click here for more Scottish recipes, such as Scottish Puff Candy, Scottish Morning Rolls or Cullen Skink Soup.

Here is the cooking process for making a clootie dumpling in a pressure cooker, I think they are also known as an Instant Pot. I remember being scared of the pressure cooker when little, however, the newer versions are so much better, and instead of hours to cook a dumpling, it took me 40 mins!

Follow these instructions to make a delicious, traditional Scottish recipe that is perfect for a cold winter’s day, all you need is a seat in front of the fire to make this heavenly explerience. This delicious dumpling can be eaten in place of Christmas cake for something that isn’t as rich.

What is a clootie dumpling?

A clootie dumpling is a traditional Scottish pudding which is a steamed fruit pudding made with fruit such as sultanas and spices. Every granny seems to have their own recipe.

What is a cloot?

A clootie is a cloth. It is also known as a cloutie, so the pudding can also be called a cloutie dumpling.

When is clootie dumpling eaten?

Traditionally served at Christmas and New Year, clootie dumpling has also been used for birthdays and other special occasions so it is suitable for any time of year.

What is in a clootie dumpling?

There are many traditional clootie dumpling recipes most have suet (beef suet or vegetable suet can be used), spices such as cinnamon and ginger, and fruit such as sultanas. Black treacle or golden syrup can be added, as can grated apple or grated carrot. Recipes have been handed down the years, so there are many variations.

What is the difference between a clootie dumpling and a Christmas pudding?

They both probably originate from the same idea of a rich fruit pudding, however, the clootie dumpling has a lighter and less rich texture than a Christmas pudding.

How do you eat a clootie dumpling?

Slice it warm slathered with butter, as a dessert topped with homemade custard or a scoop of vanilla ice cream. A clootie dumpling can be reheated in the microwave for a few seconds to stop it from being so dense. You can also fry it and serve it alongside a full Scottish breakfast. It is also tasty to eat cold.

clootie dumpling and custard

​Can you freeze clootie dumpling?

Yes, you can, simply once cooled, slice the clootie dumpling and place it into a freezer-friendly container. This will keep for up to 3 months. When you want to use the dumpling, defrost it and then either microwave to heat up or heat in the oven.

Equipment needed to make a clootie dumpling

Pressure Cooker
Large Mixing bowl
Large Baking Tray
Colander
Scissors
Wooden Spoon
Saucer – to fit in the bottom of the pot
Cloth – cheesecloth, large piece of muslin cloth, pudding cloth, tea towel or an old pillowcase
String

clootie dumpling ingredientsIngredients you will need to get together

dry ingredients
– plain flour
– oatmeal
-suet/butter
-brown sugar
-ginger
-cinnamon
-mixed spice
-baking powder
-bicarbonate of soda
-currants
-sultanas

Wet ingredients

-black treacle
-eggs
-milk

Clootie Dumpling Recipe – for a pressure cooker

Ingredients

200g Plain Flour –plus extra for dusting
125g Oatmeal
150g Suet or Unsalted Butter
125g Dark Brown Sugar
1 teaspoon Ground Ginger
1 teaspoon Ground Cinnamon
1 teaspoon Mixed Spice
1 teaspoon Baking Powder
1 teaspoon Bicarbonate of Soda
3 tablespoons Black Treacle
2 Eggs
125g Currants
125g Sultanas/Raisins

​Method

In a large mixing bowl combine flour, oatmeal, suet, sugar, spices, fruit, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, treacle and eggs.

Mix together until it forms a big sticky ball of tasty dumpling. Get your hands dirty and get in there.

Add milk to the mixture if it is too dry, not too much, just enough milk to bring it together.

Next, get your cloot and place it in the colander in your sink.

Pour enough water over the cloth. Once the water has cooled to handle, wring out the cloot.

clootie dumpling cloth and flour

Lay the cloot flat on the worktop.

Sprinkle the entire surface of the cloot with a thin layer of flour.

Place the mixture in the middle of the floured cloot.

Pull up the edges of the cloot together and cut a long length of string. Using the string, tie the top together.

clootie dumpling tied up

​Place a saucer or small plate, upside down at the bottom of the pressure cooker. Make sure that the plate can handle a lot of heat.

Place the tied clootie dumpling into your pot.

Add boiling water to the pot until the dumpling is submerged.

Cover, seal and bring up to pressure.

Let it cook for 40 mins.

​De-pressure the pressure cooker and drain off the water.

Cut the string from the tied cloot and remove the dumpling cloot carefully from the surface of the dumpling.

clootie dumpling out the pressure cooker

Place the dumpling onto a baking tray, which has been lined with greaseproof paper, and place into the oven at 180°C or 356°F, approx gas mark 4.

Bake for 5 -10 minutes, until the skin of the dumpling has darkened.

Enjoy!

sliced clootie dumpling

clootie dumpling and custard

Easy clootie dumpling recipe

Easy to make clootie dumpling recipe which is a traditional Scottish recipe served at Christmas, New Year and special occasions
Course Dessert, pudding
Cuisine scottish

Ingredients
  

  • 200 g Plain Flour –plus extra for dusting
  • 125 g Oatmeal
  • 150 g Suet or Unsalted Butter
  • 125 g Dark Brown Sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Ground Ginger
  • 1 teaspoon Ground Cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon Mixed Spice
  • 1 teaspoon Baking Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Bicarbonate of Soda
  • 3 tablespoons Black Treacle
  • 2 Eggs
  • 125 g Currants
  • 125 g Sultanas/Raisins

Instructions
 

  • In a large mixing bowl combine add flour, oatmeal, suet, sugar, spices, fruit, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, treacle and eggs.
  • Mix together until it forms a big sticky ball of tasty dumpling. Get your hands dirty and get in there.
  • Add milk to the mixture if it is too dry, not too much, just enough milk to bring it together.
  • Next, get your cloot and place it in the colander in your sink.
  • Pour enough water over the cloth.Once the water has cooled to handle, wring out the cloot.
  • Lay the cloot flat on the worktop.
  • Sprinkle the entire surface of the cloot with a thin layer of flour.
  • Place mixture in the middle of the floured cloot.
  • Pull up the edges of the cloot together and cut a long length of string. Using the string, tie the top together.
  • ​Place a saucer or small plate, upside down at the bottom of the pressure cooker. Make sure that the plate can handle a lot of heat.
  • Place the tied clootie dumpling and place it into your pot.
  • Add boiling water to the pot until the dumpling is submerged.
  • Cover, seal and bring up to pressure.
  • Let it cook for 40 mins.
  • ​De-pressure the pressure cooker and drain off the water.
  • Cut the string from the tied cloot and remove the dumpling cloot carefully from the surface of the dumpling.
  • Place the dumpling onto a baking tray, which has been lined with greaseproof paper, and place into the oven at 180°C or 356°F, approx gas mark 4.
  • Bake for 5 -10 minutes, until the skin of the dumpling has darkened.
  • Enjoy!
Keyword christmas, dessert, pressure cooker, pudding, scottish

Pin this picture for a quick reminder of how to make clootie dumpling

clootie dumpling recipe pin

Emma

Emma

Hello!

I am Emma and with my husband Mark write Foodie Explorers, which is a food and travel website.

I am a member of the Guild of Food Writers and British Guild of Travel Writers.

We have a wide range of judging experience covering products, hotels and have judged, for example, for Great Taste Awards and Scottish Baker of the Year.

Along the way Mark gained WSET Level 2 in Wine and I have WSET Level 2 in Spirits as well as picking up an award with The Scotsman Food and Drink Awards.    

Usually I can be found sleeping beside a cat.

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